Openinkstand Art & Calligraphy

How to emboss envelopes

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I don’t often do embossing on my envelopes, but when I do it provides such a kick to the design! Here I’ll show you how it works. The tools you’ll need are:

  • A rubber stamp with the design you want to emboss
  • Stamp ink pad, could be any color (preferably the color of your embossing powder though)
  • Embossing powder, any color you like
  • Heater
  • Envelope, calligraphy materials etc.

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So the first thing you want to do is stamp your design on the envelope. It can be any stamp color, but it’s preferred to use a color that is similar to your embossing powder.. though that is not necessary. Here you’ll see I used a black stamp ink. Stamp on the design good and hard!

IMG_7478While the stamp ink is still wet, pour on the embossing powder. You want to really throw it on there and cover the whole thing… don’t sprinkle it, pour it all on. Afterwards you can tip the rest back into the container, and the embossing powder will stick to the rubber stamp like magic. I try to do this carefully with a window open.. you don’t want these little powders in your body…!

IMG_7479So this is what the design looks like when I tap away the embossing powder… it’s sticking to the design! Some parts rubbed off.. (the top right flower), but I think that’s because the ink didn’t stick well. Anyway, you can see how the black stamp ink doesn’t really show through the gold powder, but I have tried other color combinations and it doesn’t all turn out right. So if you’re just gonna do one embossing powder color, it may be a good color to just buy the same color ink. They’re not too expensive.

IMG_7480Now you’ll want a heat source to seal in the powder. In this pic I used a Paper Source Heat Tool (wait till it goes on sale though). You can also find other heat guns in craft stores.. or use another heat source such as an iron or toaster.  Be careful though, as these may scorch the envelope. Unfortunately, a hair dryer isn’t hot enough :( In this pic you can see how the gold really shines up after it’s been heated and sealed.. the dark areas are still not heated. Magic!

IMG_7481Now you can see what it looks like after fully sealed. It’s gorgeous.. like engraved gold! The envelope on the top is just the black stamped ink without using the embossing powder. You can see the difference.

 

IMG_7483And there you have it! Throw in some calligraphy and it’s ready to wow your postman and penpals. Happy embossing.. and be careful, before you know it you’ll end up with 50 different powder colors etc…

7 Responses to “How to emboss envelopes”

  1. Karen Ho

    How pretty!! I wonder if there’s a way to emboss actual calligraphy writing? I don’t suppose the Staz-On could be… written with?

    Reply
    • Openinkstand

      You can definitely try writing with glue pen, an extra sticky ink or something and embossing that. I’ve tried it and it works!

      Reply
  2. Charmaine

    There is a clear embossing ink called Versamark that would be perfect for what you are doing. It’s really sticky so the embossing powders hold and since it’s clear, you don’t have to worry about it effecting the color of your powder or any bleed through if it doesn’t cover well.

    Reply
  3. Liz Heath

    I just purchased the PaperSource heat tool and Versamark pen this weekend and have been playing around with it on various papers. I have trouble getting the extra embossing powder off of the paper without knocking off part of the design. So after I run the heat tool over it I end up with little specks all around the edges of my design and paper. Any recommendations to keep the designs and surrounding paper very clean with a clear edge?

    Reply
    • Openinkstand

      Hmm.. make sure the heat tool is not TOO close to your design, it’s supposed to be about 6in off the surface. And after I apply the powder, I let it set for a second or two before gently tapping the paper to remove the extra powder. But I gotta say sometimes I still get botched embosses. It’s not always perfect!

      Reply

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